Hatch to Receive Religious Liberty’s Highest Honor

Orrin G. Hatch, champion of conscience, religion, and belief in public life, is named 2020 Canterbury Medalist

Washington DC—Orrin G. Hatch, Chairman Emeritus of the Orrin G. Hatch Foundation, has been named Becket’s 2020 Canterbury Medalist for his instrumental role in the passing of fundamental legislation in defense of religious liberty for people of all faiths. The Canterbury Medal, religious liberty’s highest honor, recognizes an individual who has demonstrated courage and commitment to defending religious freedom in America and around the world. Senator Hatch’s legacy is marked by civil discourse, principled leadership, and unfailing dedication to the defense of religious liberty for all. Becket will honor Orrin G. Hatch with the 2020 Canterbury Medal at its annual gala in New York on Thursday, May 21.

“Over more than four decades of Senate service, I worked to build coalitions of common interest to preserve religious liberty for people of all faiths. Protecting these rights is essential to the future of our republic,” said Hatch. “Receiving the Canterbury Medal is an incredible honor, and I am committed to always live worthy of it by remaining steadfast in my devotion to religious liberty.”

In his 42 years of service, Senator Hatch became the longest-serving Republican and Utahn in U.S. Senate history and earned the reputation as one of the most effective and bipartisan lawmakers of all time. In addition to sponsoring or cosponsoring over 750 bills that have become law, one of his most prized legislative successes is the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA) in 1993, which was passed by overwhelming majorities in both houses of Congress and signed into law by President Bill Clinton. In 2000, he was the primary author of the Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act (RLUIPA), which was passed unanimously in both houses of Congress. Outside of public service, Hatch is a faithful member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. A trained pianist and poetry aficionado, Senator Hatch has composed hundreds of songs for many different artists, and even boasts a holiday album. Senator Hatch continues to advance issues relating to freedom of conscience, religion, and belief through his foundation, the Orrin G. Hatch Foundation.  

“Few lawmakers have done more for the cause of religious liberty than the ‘Father of RFRA,’ Senator Orrin G. Hatch,” saidMark Rienzi, president of Becket“Senator Hatch’s legacy of championing protections for people of all faiths—and working across partisan lines to do so—has greatly strengthened religious liberty in the United States. His vital efforts will not soon be forgotten by advocates for religious liberty and those who can now freely practice their faith.”

Past medalists include the late Nobel Peace Laureate and Holocaust survivor, Elie Wiesel; Cuban poet and former political prisoner, Armando Valladares; Orthodox rabbi of the oldest Jewish congregation in the U.S., Rabbi Dr. Meir Soloveichik; First Counselor in the First Presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, President Dallin H. Oaks; and 62nd Chaplain of the U.S. Senate, Chaplain Barry C. Black.

“Senator Orrin G. Hatch is uniquely qualified for this honor. His unusually long and distinguished service in the United States Senate includes many things to honor, but none more significant to our interest than his invariable stalwart defense of religious liberty,” said President Oaks, who received the award in 2013.“By inspiring advocacy and influential action, Senator Hatch’s vision and influence has always furthered what we honor by the Canterbury Medal.”

The Canterbury Medal draws its name from one of history’s most dramatic religious liberty stand-offs, which occurred between Archbishop of Canterbury Thomas à Becket, the law firm’s namesake, and King Henry II of England. The annual Canterbury Gala honors the award recipient in a black-tie event at the Pierre Hotel in New York and is attended by the world’s most distinguished religious leaders and religious liberty advocates.

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Hatch Center Hosts US Trade Representative Lighthizer at Trade and Economics Symposium

Salt Lake City, UT—Today, the Hatch Center—the policy arm of the Orrin G. Hatch Foundation—hosted a symposium entitled “The Future of Geo-Economics and International Trade” at the Larry H. Miller Group Corporate Office in Sandy, Utah, with  United States Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer.

“I’m delighted that Ambassador Lighthizer would accept my invitation to come to Utah,” said Orrin G. Hatch, Chairman Emeritus. “Ambassador Lighthizer has a proven record of standing up for American workers, farmers, manufacturers, and businesses. And he comes to us today on the heels of two tremendous victories on trade: securing a Phase 1 Deal with China and passing the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement. These two trade deals will help shore up thousands of jobs right here in Utah and millions more across the United States.”

The event also featured a panel consisting of business leaders representing a broad cross-section of industries, including: Miles Hansen, CEO & President, World Trade Center Utah; Rich Hartvigsen, VP Global Relations & General Counsel, Nu Skin; Rob Fredericks, VP & General Manager, Vascular Devices, Becton Dickinson; Dean Fitzpatrick, President, Larry H. Miller Dealerships; Shane Manwaring, General Counsel, doTERRA; Carine Clark, Tech CEO & Silicon Slopes Executive Board; Josh Brown, Government Affairs Director, Rio Tinto; and Rob Gibson, President, Utah Farm Bureau Federation.

The Hatch Center was honored to welcome U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer to Utah for an in-depth discussion on the future of American trade relations,” said Matt Sandgren, Executive Director of the Hatch Foundation. “As the Ambassador has noticed, business is booming in the Beehive State. The challenge today is maintaining the economic momentum to ensure that the next decade of growth is even greater than the last. Expanding trade opportunities for U.S. businesses will be key to achieving that goal.”

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Deseret News Op-Ed: “Utah must lead on federal data privacy legislation”

Utah must lead on federal data privacy legislation

Because we are home to one of the fastest-growing tech hubs in the nation, we’re perfectly placed to play an active leadership role in national tech policy formation.

By Matt Sandgren | Monday, January 27, 2020

Data greases the wheels of the digital economy fueling new innovations in health care, science, transportation and technology. Its uses are manifold — and growing — to the benefit of companies and consumers alike.

Exhibit A: Silicon Slopes.

Utah’s thriving tech corridor has powered a decade of unprecedented economic growth in our state. And what’s driving this growth? In large part, data. Companies like Banjo, Pluralsight, Domo and Qualtrics have leveraged this new digital currency to fine-tune their algorithms, improve their services and ultimately create thousands of jobs. Whether we realize it or not, Utah is experiencing a data boom that is revolutionizing the way we live, communicate, do business, solve crimes and even save lives. But whether this boom goes bust depends largely on federal legislators in Washington.

Without a nationwide law regulating consumer data privacy, states will fill the void—creating a complex patchwork of state laws nearly impossible for any small business owner to navigate. For evidence, look no further than California.

This month the California Consumer Privacy Act, or CCPA, went into effect, and businesses are already feeling the pinch. CCPA is a sweeping data privacy law that exacts a heavy toll across all sectors — to the tune of $55 billion in compliance costs or 2% of California’s total GDP. And though well-established businesses can often absorb these costs, many smaller businesses, like those with fewer than 20 employees, could face upfront costs of up to $50,000. For many entrepreneurs it may be an impossible choice: comply with the law or go out of business.

But CCPA’s impact doesn’t stop at state lines. Virtually any company, no matter its state of origin, must comply with CCPA regulations when doing significant business in California. And therein lies the rub: Without a unifying federal framework, state laws like CCPA and its imitators could become the de facto laws of the land for those engaged in interstate business. While reasonable people may argue over the merits of CCPA, it’s impossible to argue that legislators in California — or any other state — should be telling people in Utah how to do business.

What is more, CCPA is causing confusion for companies all across the country. Assuming the likelihood that other states follow suit in writing their own data privacy laws, this confusion will multiply exponentially. States play an important role as laboratories of democracy but absent a unifying federal policy, a web of conflicting state laws could put both innovation and interstate commerce at risk.

That’s why we need federal action on data privacy now. And the good news is, Utah is perfectly positioned to lead this effort.Because we are home to one of the fastest-growing tech hubs in the nation, we’re perfectly placed to play an active leadership role in national tech policy formation.

In the 15 years I spent on Capitol Hill advising Sen. Orrin G. Hatch on data privacy and related issues, I watched Silicon Slopes grow from an idea on paper to the juggernaut of our economy. Because we are home to one of the fastest-growing tech hubs in the nation, we’re perfectly placed to play an active leadership role in national tech policy formation. We can’t afford to let other states dictate our data privacy policies, and we certainly can’t afford to wait until the problem becomes untenable for Utah’s businesses.

The time for federal legislation is now. Utah’s congressional delegation must lead in advancing a national proposal that uniformly protects consumer privacy without imposing undue burdens on free enterprise. We can balance these twin imperatives by empowering consumers with clearly articulated privacy rights while also providing businesses with the regulatory certainty they need to innovate and grow. By enacting a federal law on data privacy we can reap the full benefits of the data revolution and ensure another strong decade of economic growth for both Utah and the nation.

Matt Sandgren is the executive director of the Orrin G. Hatch Foundation

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Hatch Has “Every Confidence” in Fair and Judicious Impeachment Proceedings

Washington DC—Today, Orrin G. Hatch, Chairman Emeritus of The Orrin G. Hatch Foundation, released the following statement as the Senate impeachment trial begins:

“As Chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee during the impeachment trial of President Clinton, I came to appreciate the gravity and magnitude of the Senate’s duty under the Constitution ‘to try all impeachments.’ This is a solemn responsibility that requires prudence and restraint from all parties involved. I trust my former colleagues to act accordingly—and I have every confidence in the Majority Leader’s ability to guide these proceedings in a fair and judicious manner.”

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Hatch Center Hosts “Combating the Opioid Crisis” Symposium

Salt Lake City, UT—Today, the Hatch Center—the policy arm of the Orrin G. Hatch Foundation—hosted a symposium at the Joseph Smith Memorial Building in Salt Lake City, Utah, on innovative solutions to combat the opioid crisis. 

In March of last year, the Utah State Department of Injury Prevention Program reported that on average, six Utahns die every week from opioid overdose. In the Beehive State alone, from 2000 to 2015, Utah experienced a nearly 400 percent increase in deaths from the misuse and abuse of prescription drugs. And from 2013 to 2015, Utah ranked as the 7th highest state in the nation for drug overdose deaths. Click here to read the full report. 

“A crisis of this magnitude requires the collective creativity and brainpower of both the public and private sectors to address it. What we need are public-private partnerships that match the innovation of industry with the resources of government to effectively combat the opioid epidemic,” said Matt Sandgren, Executive Director of the Hatch Foundation. “That’s why this morning, we’ve gathered Utah’s brightest policy minds under one roof for a deep-dive discussion on the opioid crisis and groundbreaking solutions coming out of the private sector.”
“I appreciate Senator Hatch’s leadership and foresight to confront the opioid epidemic and pass monumental legislation in U.S. Congress back in 2000,” said Utah Senate President J. Stuart Adams. “We will only have success in ending this crisis by continuing to work together to find solutions to help those in need.”
“I am grateful to the Orrin G. Hatch Foundation for placing a spotlight on the devastating results of opioid addiction,” said Brad Wilson, Speaker of the Utah House of Representatives. “Our state would not be where it is today without the numerous experts who work tirelessly to find innovative solutions to this complex challenge. It is my hope that we will continue to work hand-in-hand to keep Utahns safe, happy, and healthy.” 
“As Utah shows leadership in the nationwide opioid crisis, we must realize in order to catch up, let alone get ahead, we will have to do things we haven’t been willing to do before,” said Damien Patton, Founder and CEO, Banjo. “We must keep ethics at the forefront and as much as we want to help, we need to protect the privacy of those battling this crisis.”
The event also included a panel of local experts, including: Mikelle Moore, Senior Vice President and Chief Community Health Officer, Intermountain Healthcare; Anna Fondario, Program Manager, Violence and Injury Prevention Program, Utah State Department of Health; Tom Ross, Bountiful City Chief of Police and Former President, Utah Chiefs of Police; and Brian Redd, Chief, Utah Department of Public Safety, State Bureau of Investigation.

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Hatch Foundation to Host “Combating the Opioid Crisis” Symposium

Salt Lake City, UT—Today, the Hatch Center—the policy arm of the Orrin G. Hatch Foundation—announced it will be hosting a symposium on innovative solutions to combat Utah’s opioid crisis. The event will be held on Wednesday, January 8 at the Joseph Smith Memorial Building in Salt Lake City, Utah. 

In March, the Utah State Department of Injury Prevention Program reported that on average, six Utahns die every week from opioid overdose. In the Beehive State alone, from 2000 to 2015, Utah experienced a nearly 400 percent increase in deaths from the misuse and abuse of prescription drugs. And from 2013 to 2015, Utah ranked as the 7th highest state in the nation for drug overdose deaths. Click here to read the full report. 

“During my Senate service, I fought diligently to combat the deadly opioid epidemic. Yet much work remains to be done,” saidOrrin G. Hatch, Chairman Emeritus of the Hatch Foundation. “I look forward to the symposium and panel discussion with Utah policymakers and stakeholders from the technology, law enforcement, and healthcare communities. This event will shed light on the importance of public-private partnerships in combating opioid abuse and provide commonsense solutions to tackling the epidemic head on.”

Participants include: Stuart Adams, President of the Utah State Senate;  Brad Wilson, Speaker of the Utah House of Representatives; Damien Patton, Founder and CEO, Banjo; Mikelle Moore, Senior Vice President and Chief Community Health Officer, Intermountain Healthcare; Anna Fondario, Program Manager, Violence and Injury Prevention Program, Utah State Department of Health; Tom Ross, Bountiful City Chief of Police and Former President, Utah Chiefs of Police; and Brian Redd, Chief, Utah Department of Public Safety, State Bureau of Investigation.

Registration is free. To attend, email events@orrinhatchfoundation.org.

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Hatch “Hopeful” after Announcement of University of Utah Mental Health Institute

Salt Lake City, UT—Today, Orrin G. Hatch, Chairman Emeritus of The Orrin G. Hatch Foundation, released the following statement after the University of Utah announced a $150 million gift from the Huntsman family to establish an institute devoted to understanding and treating mental illness.

“When it comes to suicide prevention and the effects of mental illness, my heart is both heavy and hopeful—heavy because of the many lives we have already lost in Utah, hopeful because of good people like the Huntsman family and their generous donation to the University of Utah. As with the Huntsman Cancer Institute, the establishment of the Huntsman Mental Health Institute will be transformative and provide life-saving assistance to those suffering,” said Hatch. “Although I am no longer introducing legislation such as the National Suicide Hotline Improvement Act, I am still firmly committed to being an advocate for mental health and working to save lives.”

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