Hatch Foundation Holds “Discussion On Civility” with Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch

Provo, UT—Tonight, the Hatch Center—the policy arm of the Orrin G. Hatch Foundation—hosted a symposium entitled “A Discussion on Civility” with Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch at Brigham Young University. B-roll available here.

Speakers included Kevin J Worthen, President of Brigham Young University; President Dallin H. Oaks, First Counselor in The First Presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; Justice Neil Gorsuch of the United States Supreme Court; Judge Carolyn B. McHugh, US Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit; and A. Scott Anderson, President & CEO of Zions Bank and Board Chairman of the Orrin G. Hatch Foundation. 

“Being a part of Justice Neil Gorsuch’s confirmation process was among the highlights of my time as Senator Orrin Hatch’s Chief of Staff,” said Matt Sandgren, Executive Director of the Hatch Foundation. “Justice Gorsuch is a jurist of immense intellect and impeccable character. We’re fortunate to have him on the Supreme Court, and grateful that he would accept the Hatch Foundation’s invitation to visit Utah for a special symposium on civility.”

Shown during tonight’s event was this video of Orrin G. Hatch, Chairman Emeritus of the Orrin G. Hatch Foundation, sharing his thoughts on the importance of civility.
“Republics require a lot of special conditions to exist: they require an educated citizenry, they require a citizenry that is capable of governing themselves…they require a citizenry that can speak as well as listen, that can tolerate  as well as demand tolerance.” -Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch
Justice Neil Gorsuch of the United States Supreme Court and Judge Carolyn B. McHugh of the US Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit.
“Civility is important to representative government…a lack of civility degrades our institutions, academic and other. Carried to an extreme, a lack of civility, such as policies that prevent the expression of other views in academic settings, suffocate free discourse. Civility is also important to religion. It’s a basic principle of Christianity. Civility is a virtue of civilization. It allows a politician to call out a lie, without calling someone a liar…It allows us to treat opponents as worthy of heavenly thoughts rather than destined for a special place in Hell.” – President Dallin H. Oaks, First Counselor in The First Presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

During his final years in the Senate, Hatch urged his colleagues in Congress to “recommit to civility.” He weighed in frequently on the subject through various op-eds (see here and here) and Senate floor speeches.

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